Poet stories| Three things you did not know about poets| Infographics

Poet stories- Which one of these surprises you the most?

poet stories, did not know about poets


Li Bai (Li Po) |Poet stories

Li Bai (701–762), also known as Li Bo, was a Chinese poet acclaimed from his own day to the present as a genius and a romantic figure who took traditional poetic forms to new heights. He and his friend Du Fu (712–770) were the two most prominent figures in the flourishing of Chinese poetry in the Tang dynasty, which is often called the “Golden Age of Chinese Poetry“. The expression “Three Wonders” referred to Li Bai’s poetry, Pei Min‘s swordplay, and Zhang Xu‘s calligraphy.[1]

Around a thousand poems attributed to him are extant. His poems have been collected into the most important Tang dynasty poetry anthology Heyue yingling ji,[2] compiled in 753 by Yin Fan, and thirty-four of his poems are included in the anthology Three Hundred Tang Poems, which was first published in the 18th century. In the same century, translations of his poems began to appear in Europe. The poems were models for celebrating the pleasures of friendship, the depth of nature, solitude, and the joys of drinking wine. Among the most famous are “Waking from Drunkenness on a Spring Day”, “The Hard Road to Shu”, and “Quiet Night Thought“, which still appear in school texts in China. In the West, multi-lingual translations of Li’s poems continue to be made. His life has even taken on a legendary aspect, including tales of drunkenness, chivalry, and the well-known fable that Li drowned when he reached from his boat to grasp the moon’s reflection in the river.

George MacDonald  |Poet stories

George MacDonald (10 December 1824 – 18 September 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. He was a pioneering figure in the field of fantasy literature and the mentor of fellow writer Lewis Carroll. His writings have been cited as a major literary influence by many notable authors including W. H. AudenC. S. LewisJ. R. R. Tolkien,[1] Walter de la Mare,[2] E. Nesbit and Madeleine L’Engle.[1] C. S. Lewis wrote that he regarded MacDonald as his “master”: “Picking up a copy of Phantastes one day at a train-station bookstall, I began to read. A few hours later,” said Lewis, “I knew that I had crossed a great frontier.” G. K. Chesterton cited The Princess and the Goblin as a book that had “made a difference to my whole existence”.[3]

Elizabeth Yates wrote of Sir Gibbie, “It moved me the way books did when, as a child, the great gates of literature began to open and first encounters with noble thoughts and utterances were unspeakably thrilling.”[4]

Even Mark Twain, who initially disliked MacDonald, became friends with him, and there is some evidence that Twain was influenced by MacDonald.[citation needed] Christian author Oswald Chambers wrote in his Christian Disciplines that “it is a striking indication of the trend and shallowness of the modern reading public that George MacDonald’s books have been so neglected”.[5]

Gottlob Wilhelm Burmann |Poet stories

Gottlob Wilhelm Burmann (18 May 1737 – 5 January 1805) was a German Romantic poet and lipogrammatist. He is best known for his dislike of the letter R. The letter does not appear in any of his 130 poems.[1] He is even said to have eliminated it from his daily speech, refusing to say his last name for over seventeen years.[2]