Quote of the day- CAT QUOTE 16/9/2017

CAT TO A TIGER QUOTE

cat, quoteGod made the cat to give man the pleasure of stroking a .

—Joseph Méry

What you may not have known about the common cat… ?

The 41 known cat species in the world today are all descended from a common ancestor.[9] Cats originated in Asia and spread across continents by crossing land bridges. Testing of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA revealed that the ancient cats evolved into eight main lineages that diverged in the course of at least 10 migrations (in both directions) from continent to continent via the Bering land bridge and the Isthmus of Panama, with the Panthera genus being the oldest and the Felis genus being the youngest. About 60% of the modern cat species are estimated to have developed within the last million years.[10]

Felidaes (cat families):

The biological family Felidae is a lineage of carnivorans that includes the cats. A member of this family is also called a felid.[3][4][5][6] The characteristic features of cats have evolved to support a carnivorous lifestyle, with adaptations for ambush or stalking and short pursuit hunting. They have gracile and muscular bodies, strong flexible forelimbs and retractable claws for holding prey, dental and cranial adaptations for a strong bite, and often have characteristic striped or spotted coat patterns for camouflage. Cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they are dependent on nutrients in animal flesh for survival, and because of the large proportion of meat in their diet are sometimes referred to as hypercarnivores. Of the 13 terrestrial families in the order Carnivora, they are the strictest carnivores.[7]

Living cats belong to two subfamilies, the Pantherinae and Felinae. The former comprises the “big cats” (the tigerlionjaguarleopardsnow leopardclouded leopard and Sunda clouded leopard).[5] Felinae comprises all the non-pantherine cats,[8] which range in size from the small rusty-spotted cat to the big cat-sized puma and includes such diverse forms as the lynxocelotserval and cheetah, as well as the domestic cat.

Felidae’s closest relatives are thought to be the Asiatic linsangs.[11] Together with the Viverridaehyenasmongooses, and Madagascar carnivores, they form the suborder Feliformia.[12]

Most cat species share a genetic anomaly that prevents them from tasting sweetness.[13]

Most cat species have a haploid number of 18 or 19. New World cats (those in Central and South America) have a haploid number of 18, possibly due to the combination of two smaller chromosomes into a larger one.[14]

Domestic cats may either have a long or short tail. At one point, biologists had to consider whether the short tail also found in the lynx was the ancestral or derived trait. Without looking at the fossil record, researchers were able to look at the character states found in their outgroups. Because all animals belonging to Felidae’s sister taxa, Viverridae, have long tails, scientists could infer that this character state represents the ancestral trait.[12]

Some domestic cats display a rosette pattern on their coats. This character state, however, is not related to the rosettes found on big cats. Domestic cats and big cats underwent convergent evolution for this trait. The most common ancestor to all cats had a flecked coat. Lynxes display this character state. The jaguarundi lost this character state secondarily. The most common recent ancestor of snow leopards, tigers, jaguars, lions, and leopards developed a coat with rosette patterns from the flecked patterns. Tigers and lions, however, do not display rosettes as adults. They both have lost this ancestral character state over time. Adult tigers actually display elongated rosettes that now appear as stripes. Adult lions seem to lack any distinctive markings altogether. Both juvenile tigers and lions, however, display partial rosettes. This ancestral character state appears only during these early stages, supporting the notion that ontogeny reflects phylogeny. The rosette patterns found on snow leopards, jaguars, and leopards all have a common origin.[15]

Carnivores compete against each other. There is fossil evidence that felids have been more successful than canids in North America.[16][17]

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